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Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration

http://cba.ua.edu

History and Objectives

The Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration (C&BA) is the longest-standing business school in Alabama and one of the premier programs in the South. The College has earned national recognition for excellence in business education and is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business–International (AACSB). An outstanding faculty helps maintain this tradition of excellence by continuously making advancements in academic programs using technologically advanced classrooms, laboratories and library facilities.

Lee Bidgood, the first dean of the College, launched the School of Commerce in 1919. Dean Bidgood oversaw the development of the College, including construction of the Commerce Building (now known as Bidgood Hall), which was completed in 1929. Bidgood Hall has further developed to become a central part of the technologically integrated three-building business complex in the central University campus.

The College offers degree programs at the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels. The mission of the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration is to excel in the creation and application of general and discipline-based business knowledge. We are committed to providing the educational and enrichment experiences expected of a major, full-time residential state university. 

Degrees and Programs Offered

The Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration offers one undergraduate degree, the bachelor of science in commerce and business administration (BSCBA). The Manderson Graduate School of Business offers the following degrees: master of business administration (MBA), master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), master of accountancy (MAcc), master of tax accounting (MTA) and doctor of philosophy (PhD).

Undergraduate students in commerce and business administration may major in accounting, economics, finance, general business, management, management information systems, marketing or operations management. Students in business may complete more than one major, including a non-business major, a non-business minor and a specialization in a particular business field.

Admission Requirements

Admission as a Freshman Student

A student who meets the criteria for admission to The University of Alabama as a freshman is eligible for admission to the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration as a lower-division student with the intent to major in one of eight different major programs. Specific information about these criteria is available from The University of Alabama Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Box 870132, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0132; (205) 348-5666 or toll-free 1-800-933-BAMA in the continental United States.

Admission as a Transfer Student

A student seeking to transfer into the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration from another institution must have an official transcript sent directly to the UA Office of Undergraduate Admissions (see address in preceding paragraph) from each college or university previously attended. For admission to the University and to the College, the student is required to have a minimum grade point average of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) for all college-level work attempted. For direct admission to the College’s upper division, a GPA of at least 2.5 is required for all majors except the general business major, which requires a GPA of 2.0 or above. Transferred credit hours will be applied as appropriate to a student’s degree program. The authority to apply or to deny transferred credit rests with the College.

Transfers from Two-Year Colleges

Undergraduate business programs in this catalog require 120 semester hours for the bachelor's degree. At most, 50 percent of those hours may be taken at two-year colleges and applied toward graduation requirements. Therefore, the maximum number of two-year college hours applicable to a degree in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration is 60 hours.

Only courses that are equivalent to those numbered 100 or 200 at the University (freshman- and sophomore-level courses) may be transferred to C&BA from junior colleges. Junior college transfer students may transfer courses equivalent to the following:

  • the College’s general education requirements
  • restricted and unrestricted electives
  • the University’s sophomore-level courses that satisfy the business administration functional field requirements (i.e., AC 210 Intro To Accounting, ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis and LGS 200 Legal Environmt Business)

All courses for which credit is to be transferred must be of essentially the same quality as the equivalent courses at The University of Alabama.

Transfers from Senior Colleges and Universities

Courses transferred from institutions accredited by the AACSB will be accepted within the broad limits of the College and the University graduation requirements. Students seeking to transfer credit from institutions not accredited by the AACSB, or by a regional or national accrediting agency, may be granted transfer credit on a provisional basis. Provisional credit may be validated by completing 30 semester hours in residence with a C average or better. Consult the C&BA Registrar or the UA Office of Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

A maximum of six semester hours of professional courses taken at another institution may be applied toward a student’s major program requirements. Approval is required from the head of the department in which the student expects to earn a degree. All courses for which credit is to be transferred must be of essentially the same quality as the equivalent courses at The University of Alabama. All coursework required in the major program of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy must be done in residence.

Transfers from Other Divisions of The University of Alabama

Students who wish to transfer from one division of the University to another should consult staff members in the student services office of the division into which they intend to transfer. Students are encouraged to contact the new division in advance of the semester in which they intend to transfer. Students will need information about the procedures involved in transferring, as well as the applicability of previous and present coursework to the new division’s requirements.

Students with Bachelor’s Degrees

Students who have completed an undergraduate degree and wish to complete a second degree in business must meet the requirements described for business majors in this catalog. A minimum of 30 hours of coursework beyond the first degree is required to earn a second bachelor’s degree. For more information, students should consult with an academic adviser in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center in 10 Bidgood Hall. 

Admission to the College’s Upper Division

Business students are required to apply for admission to the upper division of the College and to a major program. Application for admission to the upper division and to a major program must be made upon completion of a set of specific requirements outlined below.

Entering freshman students will be designated LAC, LEC, LFI, LMGT, LMKT, LMIS, LOM or LGB depending on their intended major. All lower-division students are administratively housed in the College, and they receive academic advising in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center in 10 Bidgood Hall.

Requirements

Students are eligible for admission to the upper division and to a major program—and are therefore entitled to enroll in 300- and 400-level business courses—only if they meet the following standards: 

  • Students must have earned a minimum of 60 hours of credit. Students may apply for admission to the upper division either in the semester during which junior standing will be achieved or after junior standing has been achieved. Credit earned by such means as Advanced Placement (AP), CLEP or departmental placement is counted toward the 60-hour requirement. Students who have completed coursework at another institution and wish to have that work applied to the 60-hour requirement must see to it that transcripts from the other institution(s) are forwarded as soon as possible to The University of Alabama. All hours completed that are not officially transferred to the student’s University of Alabama record cannot be included in the calculation of the 60-hour requirement. Courses (and hours) in which a student has earned a grade of Incomplete (I) cannot be included in the calculation of the 60-hour requirement until the grade has officially been changed to a passing grade.
  • Students must have completed the following required courses with grades of C- or higher:
EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 111Principles of Macroeconomics3
EN 101English Composition3
EN 102English Composition3
MATH 121Calculus & Applications3
MATH 125Calculus I4
ST 260Statistical Data Analysis3
AC 210Intro To Accounting4
LGS 200Legal Environmt Business3
  • Students have a maximum of three attempts at completing each of these courses with a grade of C- or higher. If the third attempt is unsuccessful, the student may petition the assistant dean for undergraduate programs for another chance to pass the course, or the student may change to another division within the University.

The remaining hours applied toward the 60-hour requirement should consist of courses required in The University of Alabama Core Curriculum and must include courses in the following categories:

  • at least four hours of natural science
  • at least three hours of fine arts, literature or humanities
  • at least three hours of history or social and behavioral sciences (in addition to EC 110 Principles of Microeconomics and EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics)

Except for the general business major, which requires a minimum grade point average of 2.0, students admitted to the upper division of the College and approved to begin C&BA coursework at the 300- and 400-level are required to have a GPA of at least 2.5 for all college-level coursework attempted, and they must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 for all University of Alabama coursework attempted. A student whose GPA falls below these standards may petition the assistant dean of undergraduate programs for admission to the upper division if the student’s GPA for the last 30 hours attempted at The University of Alabama is at least 2.5. These admission standards have been established by the C&BA faculty and are subject to change. 

If a student wishes to change majors once he or she has been admitted to the upper division, a current minimum GPA of 2.5 is required to change to any major except General Business.

Students majoring in management information systems are required to complete CS 120 Business Programming I, CS 220 Business Programming II and MIS 295 Business Analysis Project Mgt.

Students specializing in quantitative finance or quantitative economics are required to complete MATH 125 Calculus I, MATH 126 Calculus II and MATH 227 Calculus III.

Applying for Admission to the Upper Division

Students seeking admission to the College’s upper division should apply in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall. The application should be submitted to the student's academic adviser during a scheduled advising session. Business students will not be permitted to enroll in upper-division courses unless they have applied and been admitted to the upper division. Students who have completed all requirements for admission to the upper division, but have failed to complete the required application for admission, will be barred from enrolling in upper-level courses until they have met with an adviser to verify their eligibility. Application deadlines are as follows:

  1. A student who wishes to apply for admission to the upper division and to a major program, and who wishes to begin taking junior-level and major courses during the Interim term, summer session or fall semester, should apply by March 15 preceding those terms.
  2. Qualified new transfer students and returning students who meet the criteria as a result of attending summer school should apply no later than July 15 for fall semester admission.
  3. A student who expects to begin upper-level work in the spring semester should apply no later than October 15. 

Students who are applying for admission to the upper division at the midpoint of a semester will be applying based on coursework they expect to complete during that semester. A decision concerning admission will be conditional until the successful completion of coursework produces the required cumulative hours and grade point average. Admission will be revoked should a student fail to achieve the required grade point average or complete the required courses and hours in which he or she is enrolled during the semester in which application is made.

Students who attempt to enroll in 300- or 400-level courses in violation of any of these policies will be administratively disenrolled from courses for which they are not eligible.

Non-Business Majors in Upper-Level C&BA Courses

Students from other divisions of the University may enroll in 300- and 400-level C&BA courses, subject to the following conditions: 

  1. Students must have achieved junior standing, defined as a minimum of 60 earned credit hours. Economics majors and economics minors in the College of Arts and Sciences may enroll in 300-level economics (EC) courses prior to achieving junior standing.
  2. Students must have earned credit for course-specific prerequisites  the courses in which they wish to enroll.
  3. The total number of hours in C&BA coursework for which a non-business major can enroll may not exceed 30 semester hours (excluding EC 110 Principles of Microeconomics, EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics and ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis) without approval from the associate dean for undergraduate programs.

Students who attempt to enroll in 300- or 400-level C&BA courses in violation of any of these policies will be administratively disenrolled from courses for which they are not eligible.

General Degree Requirements and Academic Policies

The requirements specified in this catalog are intended for all students who begin their college careers during or after the fall of 2013. Students who have begun their careers prior to fall 2013 may choose to complete the requirements outlined in this catalog, but if they do so, they must complete all of the requirements listed here. Students may not choose some requirements from this catalog and some from previous catalogs.

Student Responsibilities

  • Each student is responsible for selecting courses that will allow him or her to make reasonable progress toward a degree in the College. An appointment with an adviser in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center to develop a long-term academic plan is strongly encouraged.
  • Each student is responsible for following University and College policies appearing in official documents, including those on the University and College websites, that govern academic programs, curricula, courses and completion of degrees.
  • Each student is expected to pursue successful completion of all courses in which he or she enrolls.
  • Each student is expected to maintain a current and accurate mailing address, email address and phone number with the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, and to respond promptly to all communications from the University and the College.
  • Each student is expected to be familiar with the current academic calendar.

Maximum Class Hour Load Per Semester

Entering freshman students may enroll in a maximum of 16 semester hours during the first semester in residence. Continuing students may register for a maximum of 16 semester hours during the fall and spring semesters and a maximum of 14 semester hours during the summer session without special permission.

Students must register for a minimum of 12 semester hours in order to be classified as full-time students. Students who wish to take less than a full-time load must secure permission from the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs.

Auditing Courses

Students may register for courses as auditors with the approval of the departments offering the courses. The deadline for registering as a course auditor coincides with the deadline for adding courses at the beginning of each semester. Consult the College Registrar for more information.

The requirements that auditors are expected to meet in an audited course are left to the discretion of the instructor. Audited courses do not count toward degree requirements.

Online Courses

C&BA students may enroll in online courses through the College of Continuing Studies. An online course with the same course number as a regularly scheduled on-campus course fulfills the same degree requirements as an on-campus course. Further information about online courses is available through the College of Continuing Studies.

Pass/Fail Option

The University and the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration offer students the opportunity to pursue courses on a pass/fail basis as a means of encouraging students to broaden their interests and learning experiences beyond their business specializations. To register for a course on a pass/fail basis, a student must gain approval in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall. The deadline for registering for a course on a pass/fail basis coincides with the deadline for adding courses at the beginning of each semester.

The College Registrar is responsible for determining that each student requesting the pass/fail option meets the following criteria:

  1. The student must have attained sophomore standing (a minimum of 30 hours earned).*
  2. If the student is a transfer student, he or she must have earned 15 hours or more in residence, maintaining a grade point average of at least 2.0 in residence.*
  3. The student must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 or higher.
  4. The course the student wishes to take on a pass/fail basis must be a non-commerce elective. Business courses (required or elective) may not be taken on a pass/fail basis except in the case of courses that are offered only as pass/fail courses.
  5. Courses that will be used to satisfy University of Alabama Core Curriculum requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
  6. The student may take a maximum of four courses (or 12 hours) of coursework on a pass/fail basis while earning an undergraduate degree.
  7. The student may take no more than one course per semester on a pass/fail basis.
  8. Business students will not be allowed to register for courses on a pass/fail basis after the deadline for adding courses, and once the option is selected it may not be rescinded.

*Several specialized courses offered only on a pass/fail basis may be taken in the freshman year or the first semester in residence (for transfer students). Consult the C&BA Student Services Office for further information.

Policy on Repeating Courses

A course may be repeated, but the record of both the original and the repeat enrollment will appear on the student’s transcript. Both attempts will be counted as hours attempted, but only the second attempt will count as hours earned for the degree. If the course is passed on the first attempt, but failed on the second attempt, the student will not earn credit for the course toward a degree.

The MIS Program and the Culverhouse School of Accountancy have their own rules for repeating courses required in their majors. Consult the MIS Program and the Culverhouse School of Accountancy for more information.

Policy on Mathematics Courses

The analysis of many business problems calls for mathematical reasoning. Students should take the highest-level mathematics sequence for which they are eligible. The MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra and MATH 121 Calculus & Applications sequence provides the minimum skills for pursuing an undergraduate business degree, but this is not a substitute for MATH 125 Calculus I. Any sequence that includes MATH 125 Calculus I is preferable to the MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra and MATH 121 Calculus & Applications sequence. Those students who are interested in graduate study or in working in technical positions should choose a course of study that will lead to at least partial completion of the standard calculus sequence: MATH 125 Calculus I, MATH 126 Calculus II and MATH 227 Calculus III.

Below are specific rules that govern mathematics requirements for Commerce and Business Administration students:

  1. Once a student has earned credit for MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra and/or MATH 121 Calculus & Applications or MATH 125 Calculus I, the student may not earn credit, including CLEP, for lower-numbered mathematics courses.
  2. The College will not grant degree credit for any mathematics course numbered lower than MATH 100 Intermediate Algebra at The University of Alabama.
  3. The College will not grant degree credit for any mathematics course offered for transfer credit from a junior college which is titled, or has the substance of, "business mathematics” or “mathematics for finance.”

Selecting a Major

Eligible students should complete major declaration forms in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall. Students who intend to major in accounting or management information systems must apply to the respective departments.

A student who is admitted to the upper division but is not yet ready to declare a major must change from lower-division status (see Admission to the College's Upper Division section under the Admission Requirements tab of this section of the catalog) to General Business status until he or she is ready to select a major program. Students who need information to enable them to select majors appropriate to their academic and career interests should consult with faculty advisers in the respective departments or with the staff of the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall.

If a student wishes to change majors after admission to the upper division, a current minimum GPA of 2.5 is required to change to any major except General Business.

Department and Program Requirements

A total of 120 hours, distributed as follows, are required for the degree of bachelor of science in commerce and business administration:

General Education Courses

EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 111Principles of Macroeconomics3
EN 101English Composition3
EN 102English Composition3
MATH 121 or Calculus & Applications 13
MATH 125 Calculus I
ST 260Statistical Data Analysis3


Natural Science: eight hours designated N, including at least two hours of laboratory experience.

Humanities and Fine Arts12 hours total; at least three hours of Literature* (designated L) and at least three hours of Fine Arts (designated FA). The remaining six hours may be chosen from either Humanities (designated HU), Literature or Fine Arts. *Every student must complete a six-hour sequence in either Literature or History.

History and Social/Behavioral Sciences: 12 hours total; at least three hours in History* (designated HI) and at least six hours chosen from other disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences (designated SB). EC 110 Principles of Microeconomics and EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics (required above) satisfy six hours of this requirement. *Every student must complete a six-hour sequence in either Literature or History.

Foreign Language or Computer Language: Two semesters (six to eight hours) of foreign language credit (designated FL) or two semesters of C-designated computer language courses (six hours). This requirement will be satisfied by completing ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis and one additional C-designated course; some majors require a specific course to complete this requirement. See departmental sections for details. 2

Lower Division Functional Field Courses

AC 210Intro To Accounting4
LGS 200Legal Environmt Business3

1 Students with the required high-school units in mathematics are classified by means of standardized placement tests; only those with satisfactory placement test scores are admitted to MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra. Students who do not make satisfactory scores should complete MATH 100 Intermediate Algebra before taking MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra. MATH 100 Intermediate Algebra may be counted toward the degree as a  non-commerce elective. In certain cases, students with very weak backgrounds in mathematics may be required to complete MATH 005 Introductory Algebra, which is a noncredit course. Students who concentrate in quantitative finance are required to complete MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra or MATH 115 Precalc Algebra & Trig, MATH 125 Calculus I, and MATH 126 Calculus II. Other majors require students to complete MATH 112 Precalculus Algebra and MATH 121 Calculus & Applications, or MATH 115 Precalc Algebra & Trig and MATH 125 Calculus I.  MATH 125 Calculus I and MATH 126 Calculus II are four-hour courses.

2 Students must complete two semesters (six to eight hours) of a foreign language designated FL or earn equivalent credit by examination; or they must earn six semester hours in C-designated courses. Foreign language courses must be selected from non-commerce electives taken to meet the general education requirements. Students enrolling in C courses are expected to have basic computer application skills. Students lacking these skills, as determined by university policy, will be required to take a course or courses designed to develop the required skills. Credit for the course(s) will count as part of the students' electives.

Upper Division

Applicants for the upper division in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration must complete at least 60 semester hours prior to admission into the upper division. The 60 hours should be chosen from the requirements listed above and must include degree credits for EC 110 Principles of Microeconomics and EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics; MATH 121 Calculus & Applications or MATH 125 Calculus I; EN 101 English Composition and EN 102 English Composition; AC 210 Intro To Accounting; ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis; and LGS 200 Legal Environmt Business (or their equivalents). Additionally, at least four hours of natural science, three hours of fine arts, literature or humanities, and three hours of history or social and behavioral sciences. Failure to earn degree credit for these specific courses and to earn at least 60 semester hours in all will make students ineligible for admission to the upper division and for enrollment in 300- and 400-level C&BA courses.

Upper Division Functional Field Courses

FI 302Business Finance3
GBA 300Business Communications3
GBA 490Strategic Management3
MGT 300Org Theory & Behavior3
MKT 300Marketing3
OM 300Intro Operations Management3

Major Program Courses: 18 hours; see departmental listings for specific requirements in each major.

Electives: 22-33 hours; GBA 145 Freshman Compass: CBA is highly recommended for students who enter the College as freshmen.

All business students are required to take at least one course that has an international focus. The course can be selected from courses in international business or from approved courses with international content in other colleges. Students should consult with their advisor for a list of approved courses.

Some departments may specify some of the elective courses. Consult your major department for further information.

Suggested Courses for Freshman and Sophomore Years

The following suggested course sequences for freshman and sophomore (lower-division) students are intended to assist students in planning their schedules to include the required pre-business coursework. Academic advisoers for C&BA students are available in the A.H. Bean Undergraduate Student Services Center, 10 Bidgood Hall.

Suggested Course Sequence for Students Placed into MATH 100

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
EN 1013EC 1103
GBA 1451EN 1023
MATH 1003MATH 1123
Core Fine Arts3Core Natural Science4
Core History3Free Elective (or MIS 200 for General Business majors)3
Core Humanities or Fine Arts3 
 16 16
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
EC 1113AC 2104
MATH 121 or 1253LGS 2003
Core History or SB Science3ST 2603
Core Literature3Free elective3
Core Natural Science4Core Literature, Humanities, or Fine Arts3
 16 16
Total Hours: 64

 

 

Suggested Course Sequence for Students Placed into MATH 112

Freshman
FallHoursSpringHours
EC 1103EC 1113
EN 1013EN 1023
GBA 1451MATH 121 or 1253
MATH 1123Free Elective (or MIS 200 for General Business majors)3
Core Fine Arts3Core Natural Science4
Core History3 
 16 16
Sophomore
FallHoursSpringHours
ST 2603AC 2104
Core History or SB Science3LGS 2003
Core Humanities or Fine Arts3Free Electives6
Core Literature3Core Literature, Humanities, or Fine Arts3
Core Natural Science4 
 16 16
Total Hours: 64

 

Major Programs

The following majors are offered in the College of Commerce and Business Administration. Each major requires 18 hours of coursework:

  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • General Business
  • Management
  • Management Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management

In addition to the requirements for the major, students are encouraged to complete a second major, specialization in business, and/or a major or minor outside of business. Students should consult with their advisors and major departments about approved courses of study. Some majors require specializations.

Curriculum VII - For College Graduates

The business curriculum for college graduates is available to those who hold baccalaureate degrees from regionally accredited institutions in any recognized field of study other than business and who have a grade point average of at least 2.5 for all college-level coursework attempted and at least a 2.5 GPA for all University of Alabama coursework attempted. A student whose GPA falls below these standards may petition the assistant dean for undergraduate programs for admission if the student’s GPA is at least 2.5 or above for the last 30 hours of coursework attempted. Curriculum VII leads to the bachelor of science in commerce and business administration degree, following completion of the undergraduate work outlined below. Curriculum VII is for the college graduate who wants a professional degree in commerce and business administration on the undergraduate level. At least 30 semester hours of study in residence in the College of Commerce and Business Administration are required.

In addition to the 2.5 GPA requirement, the prerequisites for Curriculum VII include completion of the requirements for the Alabama Statewide General Studies Core Curriculum in natural science, fine arts, literature and humanities, history, social and behavioral sciences, and the University of Alabama Core Curriculum requirement in computer science or foreign language. Students must complete AC 210 Intro To Accounting, CS 102 Microcomputer Applications, EC 110 Principles of MicroeconomicsEC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics, LGS 200 Legal Environmt BusinessMATH 121 Calculus & Applications and ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis (or their equivalents) with grades of C- or higher. Any of this coursework completed in pursuit of the first bachelor’s degree will apply to the second degree under Curriculum VII. These prerequisites must be completed before Curriculum VII students can enroll in 300- or 400-level C&BA courses. Failure to complete the prerequisites will result in administrative disenrollment from 300- or 400-level C&BA courses. The course requirements of Curriculum VII follow.

Curriculum VII Course Requirements

Hours
Lower Division Requirements22
Intro To Accounting
Microcomputer Applications
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Legal Environmt Business
Calculus & Applications
Statistical Data Analysis
Business Administration Functional Field Courses
Business Finance
Business Communications
Strategic Management
Org Theory & Behavior
Marketing
Intro Operations Management
Major Program Courses18
Specialization (if required)0-15
Total Hours40-55

 

University Scholars Programs

The University Scholars program allows students to pursue graduate and undergraduate degrees concurrently. These programs are available in several business disciplines and serve students who have exceptional ability. Students should contact their major department for details.

Specializations

Each academic department offers specializations within the department's subject areas. Students should consult with their adviser and major department about current offerings and requirements, as these are subject to change. Students must meet all course-specific prerequisites for each course in a specialization, and must meet the requirements for admission to the upper division of the College in order to take 300- and 400-level courses.

Courses from a major program cannot be used to satisfy specialization requirements unless otherwise noted, or unless permission is granted by the department chair.

Some specializations are restricted to certain majors, and some are prohibited for other majors. See the description of each specialization for details.

A minimum GPA of 2.0 for all required courses in a specialization is necessary for the specialization to be awarded.

Culverhouse School of Accountancy

Economics, Finance and Legal Studies

Information Systems, Statistics and Management Science

Management and Marketing

Business Certificates

Certificate in Ethics and Social Responsibility

Students in business are encouraged to complete a Certificate in Ethics and Social Responsibility, which will be recognized on their transcripts. Goals of the program are to increase students' abilities to recognize moral dilemmas and exercise moral decision-making abilities and to develop insights into contemporary ethical issues faced by individuals and organizations. In addition, a goal of the program is to focus campus attention on the importance of addressing ethical issues and creating graduates who will be recognized for having formally addressed these issues.

Requirements

  1. One course with a primary ethics and social responsibility focus (recommended: PHL 292 Introduction to Ethics or MGT 341 Business Ethics).
  2. One course in service learning (click here for a list), or participation in the Moral Forum.
  3. Participation in three activities or events with approved ethics and social responsibility content. These events would include presentations on relevant subjects and discussion sessions covering readings or other assignments. At least one event should be held each semester.

Analytical Excellence Certificate in Business

Taking the classes required for the Analytical Excellence Certificate in Business will give students the best possible background for graduate work in business or for work in the most technically demanding areas. This program allows talented students to utilize the math skills they acquired in high school and to develop quantitative skills equivalent to those developed by engineering graduates. In addition, the designation allows them to signal to employers and others that they have completed a special curriculum. The required courses include the regular calculus sequence. After completing the calculus sequence, students in the program have the choice of several additional classes to complete the program. Students who complete this program will be excellent candidates to enroll in the best graduate business programs in the country.

A cumulative UA GPA of 3.5 at graduation is required to complete this certificate. 

Required Courses

Hours
MATH 125Calculus I4
MATH 126Calculus II4
MATH 227Calculus III4
Choose three of the following:9
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Appld Diff Equations I
Mathematical Statistics I
Theory Of Probability
Mathematical Statistics II
Math Stats W/Applictn I
Economic Forecast & Analysis
Econometrics
Stat Methods In Res I
Stat Methods In Res II
Mathematics For Finance I
Marketing Research
Total Hours21

 

 

Minors in Business for Non-Business Majors

Students enrolled in divisions of the University other than the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration may apply for admission to one of the business minors supported by the College, subject to the provisions stated below. Approval of the student’s dean is required.

Except for the general business minor, which requires a minimum grade point average of 2.0, non-business majors admitted to a business minor must have a GPAs of 2.5 or higher for all college-level and University of Alabama coursework attempted. A student whose GPA falls below these standards may petition the associate dean for undergraduate programs of the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration for admission to the business minor if the student’s GPA for the last 30 hours attempted is at least 2.5. A student admitted to a business minor will be permitted to enroll in all courses required for that specific minor even if the student’s GPA subsequently falls below a 2.5, provided all other enrollment requirements are met. All 300- or 400-level courses in the minor must be taken in residence at UA, unless permission is given by a C&BA department chair to transfer a course from another four-year institution.

Non-business students must complete the course-specific prerequisites for each minor program course and must have earned credit for a minimum of 60 semester hours at the time they enroll in the 300- or 400-level courses. Non-business majors may earn degree credit for no more than 30 semester hours of C&BA courses (excluding EC 110 Principles of Microeconomics, EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics and ST 260 Statistical Data Analysis) without approval of the associate dean for undergraduate programs. Failure to comply with these policies will result in administrative disenrollment from C&BA courses.

Students are responsible for ensuring that they have met all University,C ollege, major and minor requirements. However, each student must meet with an adviser in the major department for academic planning and to be cleared for registration each semester. College advisers are also available for additional assistance with minor, College and University requirements.

Entrepreneurship

Hours
EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
AC 210Intro To Accounting4
MGT 300Org Theory & Behavior3
MGT 386Foundations of Entrepreneurshi3
MGT 482New Venture Development3
Choose one of the following:3
Retail Management
Managing Innovation
or C&BA course approved by dept.
Total Hours19

 

General Business

Hours
AC 210Intro To Accounting4
EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
ST 260Statistical Data Analysis3
Choose three of the following (two must be 300-level or above):9
Business Finance
Legal Environmt Business
Org Theory & Behavior
Fundamentals Mgt Info Systems
Marketing
Intro Operations Management
Total Hours19

 

Management

Hours
AC 210Intro To Accounting4
MGT 300Org Theory & Behavior3
MGT 301Intro Human Resource Mgt3
MGT 320Leadership3
MGT 386Foundations of Entrepreneurshi3
Choose two of the following:6
Multinatl Business Communctn
Business Ethics
Organizational Change
Corporate Entp. & Innovation
Total Hours22

 

World Business

Hours
AC 210Intro To Accounting4
IBA 350Intro World Business3
IBA 455Global Marketing3
MKT 300Marketing3
PSC 434Internatl Polit Econom3
Choose two of the following:6
Multinatl Business Communctn
Export/Import Management
International Trade
International Finance
Economic Development of Latin America
Comparative Economic Systems
Total Hours22

 

Double Major in Business and Foreign Language

The modern business environment is truly global, and the double major provides students the training necessary to succeed in that environment. The double-major student completes a C&BA major program, as well as a second major in French, German or Spanish. The result is a superior skill set derived from cutting-edge business training and thorough study of a language and the culture associated with it. Such a program creates students who are technically proficient, culturally sensitive and flexible enough to deal with the business challenges of the future.

Foreign Language Courses for Double Majors

In addition to the requirements for a major in business, students must complete the requirements in a foreign language described in the following sections. Students should consult with the C&BA Registrar about current requirements for dual-degree programs (as opposed to double majors).

C&BA Second Major in French

Hours
FR 201Intermediate French3
FR 202Intermediate French3
FR 321Voices In French3
FR 323Text, Image, And Word3
FR 324Commercial French3
Choose two of the following:6
French Civilization
Intro Romance Linguistic (Same as IT 361 and SP 361)
Contemp French Civiliztn
French Linguistics
Undergrad Sem In French (topic appropriate)
Special Topics
Choose two of the following:6
Survey Fr Literature I
Survey Fr Literature II
Undergrad Sem In French (topic appropriate)
Special Topics
Other French literature course
FR 300/400-level electives6
Total Hours33

 

C&BA Second Major in German

Hours
GN 201Intermediate German I3
GN 202Intermediate German II3
GN 361Interm Convers Comp I3
GN 365Business German3
GN 371German Culture and Civilization Thru 18323
GN 372Germn Cult Civ 1832-Present3
GN 403
  & GN 404
Undergraduate Seminar
   and Undergraduate Seminar
6
or GN 404 and an additional GN literature course
GN electives (GN 450 Intermediate Business German highly recommended)9
Total Hours33

 

C&BA Second Major in Spanish

Hours
SP 201Intermediate Spanish3
SP 202Intermediate Spanish3
SP 353Spanish Conversation3
SP 356Adv Grammar And Compos3
SP 360Commercial Spanish3
SP 364Spanish Civilization3
SP 366Spanish-American Civ3
Choose two of the following:6
Survey Of Spanish Lit
Survey Of Spanish Lit
Masterpc Sp-Amer Lit I
Masterpc Sp-Amer Lit II
Spanish electives (300/400-level)6
Total Hours33

 

Accountancy (AC) Courses

AC 210. Intro To Accounting. 4 sem. hrs.

Introduction to accounting and financial reporting concepts and the use of accounting information in financial and managerial decisions. Students who intend to major in accounting should take AC 289 before or concurrently with AC 210.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110.

AC 289. Computer Applications. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to information technology and computer applications in business. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): CS 102 or CS 114 or CBH 101.

AC 310. Finan Report Analy Bus Activ I. 3 sem. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): AC 201 and AC 202; or AC 210.

AC 311. Fin Report Analy Bus Activ II. 3 sem. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): AC 310.

AC 334. Introduction to Fraud Risk Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course provides a basic overview of fraud risk management in business, including the global fraud problem, fraud risk identification, assessment, prevention, detection, and follow-up.
Prerequisite(s): AC 210.

AC 351. Managerl Acctg Decisions. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of managerial accounting concepts and their use in business decisions. Not open to accounting majors.
Prerequisite(s): AC 210 or AC 201 and AC 202.

AC 352. Corporate Financl Report. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of financial accounting concepts and their use in analyzing and interpreting financial reports. Not open to accounting majors.
Prerequisite(s): AC 210 or AC 201 and AC 202.

AC 361. Cost Analysis Plang & Control. 3 sem. hrs.

A study of the theory and application of accounting for measuring the economic attributes of the firm's operations. The course examines the measurement, analysis, and interpretation of accounting information for planning and controlling a firm's business-related activities.
Prerequisite(s): AC 201 and AC 202; or AC 210.

AC 371. Introduction To Taxation. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to tax policy, planning, practice, and research with an emphasis on income taxation.
Prerequisite(s): AC 201 and AC 202; or AC 210.

AC 389. Acct Info Syst Dev Opern Cntrl. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the operation and development of accounting information systems, e-business applications, networking, and controls. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): AC 289 or CS 285; and AC 310.

AC 415. Current Issues in the Accounting Profession. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is for accounting students who are returning from a spring internship.

AC 432. Intro Corp Gov Risk Assess. 3 sem. hrs.

A risk-oriented study of standards, concepts, procedures, and professional ethics underlying governance and the practice of external and internal auditing and assurance services. The course will focus on mechanisms and activities that enhance the reliability of information for decision making.
Prerequisite(s): AC 311 and AC 389.

AC 456. Govt & Non-Profit Acctg. 3 sem. hrs.

Special features of budgetary and fund accounting are applied to municipalities, other government units, and institutions such as schools and hospitals.
Prerequisite(s): AC 310.

AC 471. Taxation Bus Transact Organizt. 3 sem. hrs.

Examination of the tax implications of business formations, transactions between the entity and the owners, reorganizations, and liquidations. The course develops tax research skills.

AC 491. Independent Study. 3 sem. hrs.

AC 492. Accounting Internship. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations.

AC 497. Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs.

Economics (EC) Courses

EC 110. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to microeconomic analysis concentrating on consumer and producer behavior, competitive and imperfect markets, public policy and regulation, and income distribution.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146.

EC 111. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to macroeconomic analysis concentrating on national income, price levels, employment, monetary and fiscal policies, and international trade and development.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110.

EC 210. Microeconomic Policy Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

This course uses economic analysis to examine a range of public policy issues.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110.

EC 211. Macroeconomic Policy Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

Building on the macroeconomics background of EC 111, students will consider current national and international economic problems and issues.
Prerequisite(s): EC 111.

EC 300. Current Economic Problms. 3 sem. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 308. Intermediate Microeconomics. 3 sem. hrs.

Examination of the theory of price and the theory of resource allocation. Topics include demand theory, production and cost functions, pricing and output under competitive and noncompetitive conditions, resource markets, and rudiments of general equilibrium analysis.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125; and EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 309. Intermediate Macroeconomics. 3 sem. hrs.

A study of the theoretical framework underlying income, employment, and growth analysis.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 389. Computerized Mgt Info Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the components of computerized management information systems and applications of computer-based systems to business decisions. Students may not receive credit for EC 389 and FI 389.
Prerequisite(s): ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and AC 210 and EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

EC 400. Analysis Econ Cond Micro.Macro. 3 sem. hrs.

Not open to majors in economics and finance. Uses basic economic theory to assess real-world business and economic conditions at the micro and macro levels.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and OM 300 and FI 302.

EC 410. Law And Economics. 3 sem. hrs.

This course will use the tools of economic analysis to analyze public policy issues and to explore the intersections between the law and economics. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 412. Industrial Organization. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the various types of industry structure, conduct, and performance; business strategies; and policy alternatives. Emphasizes case studies from the major types of industry.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 413. Economic Forecast & Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the analytical techniques used by economists to forecast the macro and micro levels of economic activity and the effects of public policy on the economy. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308 and EC 309.

EC 416. Monetary Theory & Policy. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the role of money in the economy and the conduct of monetary policy. Emphasis is given to the money supply process, the demand for money, and the choice of monetary-policy strategies and procedures.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 423. Public Finance. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the principles of taxation, government expenditures, borrowing, and fiscal administration.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 430. International Trade. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of theoretical principles underlying international trade, with application of these principles to recent developments and to current national policies.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 431. International Finance. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the field of international finance. Course deals primarily with international financial markets and the macroeconomics of international financial flows. Topics include foreign exchange and international securities markets and international banking.
Prerequisite(s): FI 301 or EC 309 or EC 430.

EC 442. Economic Development of Latin America. 3 sem. hrs.

A comparative analysis of economic strategies, problems, issues, and policy outcomes with special attention given to Mexico, Costa Rica, Cuba, and Brazil.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 444. Political Economy of Terrorism. 3 sem. hrs.

Rational actor models applied to the study of terrorism. Empirical examination of the economic impact of terrorism and of the effectiveness of anti-terrorism policies.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 450. History of Economic Concepts. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the development of economic theory from Adam Smith to the present day.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308 and EC 309.

EC 453. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Comparative analysis of contrasting economic systems based on the type of ownership (private versus state) and on the coordinating mechanism (market versus central command). Emphasis is given to fundamental changes in economic systems that are currently under way.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 470. Intro To Math Econ. 3 sem. hrs.

Application of selected mathematical methods to the analysis of economic problems.
Prerequisite(s): EC 309.

EC 471. Econometrics. 3 sem. hrs.

This course emphasizes statistical methods for analyzing data used by social scientists. Topics include simple and multiple regression analyses and the various methods of detecting and correcting data problems such as autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125; and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 473. Games and Decisions. 3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to game theory with emphasis on application. Game theory is a toolbox for analyzing situations where decision makers influence one another.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125 with a minimum grade of C-.

EC 480. Econ Of Environment. 3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the techniques used to estimate benefits of environmental improvements, and an analysis of public policy relating to the environment and use of natural resources.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 482. Seminar On Econ Issues. 3 sem. hrs.

Group discussion of current economic issues together with analysis and policy recommendations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 483. Health Care Economics. 3 sem. hrs.

An investigation of the microeconomics of the American health care delivery system. The course focuses on the demand for and supply of health care services and emphasizes the efficiency and equity characteristics of the system.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

EC 491. Independent Study. 1-6 sem. hr.

Students may earn degree credit for only one independent study course (491).
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 492. Internship. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations. The internship is administered through the C&BA Office of Student Services.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

EC 497. Spec Topics In Economics. 1-3 sem. hr.

Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

Finance (FI) Courses

FI 101. Financial Economics. 3 sem. hrs.

A lower division course that bridges the gap between secondary school curriculum requirements for personal finance and upper division core course FI 302 Business Finance.

FI 301. Intro Financl Instit Mkt. 3 sem. hrs.

Overview of the financial systems in which business operates, with emphasis on financial institutions, instruments, and markets.

FI 302. Business Finance. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of financial objectives of business enterprise, sources of capital, and financial management of business assets. Emphasis is on establishing a framework for making financing, investing, and dividend decisions.

FI 314. Intro To Investing. 3 sem. hrs.

FI 331. Principles of Real Estate. 3 sem. hrs.

Survey of various aspects of real estate business and economics, including marketing, finance, development, law, appraising, etc. FI 331 can be taken concurrently with FI 302.
Prerequisite(s): FI 302 or CE 366 or ME 203
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FI 302.

FI 334. Intro to Real Estate Property Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Provides an introduction to the principles of real property management and covers all aspects of the property management process. Students are shown how to maximize the asset value of income-producing real estate for investors/owners through the use of finance, marketing, and management techniques. FI 334 can be taken concurrently with FI 331.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 331
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FI 331.

FI 341. Fundamentals of Risk Management & Insurance. 3 sem. hrs.

Introductory study of life insurance and "personal lines" of property insurance, especially homeowners insurance and auto insurance. Economic environment of insurance and how to read and evaluate insurance contracts. Examines different types of life insurance contracts as well as savings and investment alternatives and their uses in estate planning.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

FI 360. Personal Asset Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

To teach students about financial assets as vehicles for saving for the future. Students will also learn how to invest in a combination of assets to meet their objectives and how their objectives may change over their life span.

FI 389. Computerized Mgt Info Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the components of computerized management information systems and applications of computer-based systems to business decisions. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111; and FI 302 or CE 366 or IE 203.

FI 400. Financl Instit Markets Investm. 3 sem. hrs.

Builds on the foundation laid in the business core to extend the student's knowledge of basic finance into the areas of operation and management of financial institutions and financial markets and investments.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and AC 210 and FI 302.

FI 410. Intermediate Financial Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

Development of advanced practices of financial management and their application to decision making in the business firm.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 411. Corporate Finance Policy. 3 sem. hrs.

An integrative course designed to give the student experience in problem solving in finance. Cases will be used to permit students to apply what they know to specific business problems.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FI 410 and FI 410.

FI 412. Money & Capital Market. 3 sem. hrs.

An overall view of the financing process and the role of financial markets. Areas covered are characteristics of instruments traded in money and capital markets; determinants of and the relationships between different asset prices; and international aspects of financial markets.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 413. Working Capital Management. 3 sem. hrs.

FI 410 Students will develop the analytical expertise and the practical knowledge in the area of working capital management.
Prerequisite(s): FI 410.

FI 414. Investments. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the various investment media together with analysis models of investment management. Emphasis is on investment decision making and portfolio analysis.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 415. Adv Investment Topics. 3 sem. hrs.

Advanced models for investment management are developed and their application in decision making is discussed. Emphasis is on the use of models for portfolio selection.
Prerequisite(s): FI 414.

FI 416. Monetary Theory & Policy. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the role of money in the economy and the conduct of monetary policy. Emphasis is given to the money supply process, the demand for money, and the choice of monetary-policy strategies and procedures.
Prerequisite(s): FI 301.

FI 419. Financial Derivatives. 3 sem. hrs.

Addresses managing financial risks such as adverse stock price movements, adverse interest rate changes and adverse commodity price changes with specific attention given to employing futures, options and swap contracts.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FI 302 and FI 414.

FI 421. Bank Administration. 3 sem. hrs.

Survey of analytical methods in banking, including study of the powers of various government agencies. Emphasis is placed on managerial aspects of commercial banking.
Prerequisite(s): FI 301 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 423. Public Finance. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of principles of taxation, government expenditures, borrowing, and fiscal administration.
Prerequisite(s): EC 308.

FI 431. International Finance. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the field of international finance. Course deals primarily with international financial markets and the macroeconomics of international financial flows. Topics include foreign exchange and international securities markets and international banking.
Prerequisite(s): FI 301 or EC 309 or EC 430.

FI 432. Real Estate Appraisal. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the sources of real estate value and techniques for estimating property value; study of effective use of appraisal information.
Prerequisite(s): FI 302 or CE 366 or IE 203.

FI 436. Real Estate Financing. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of the institutions of real estate finance and of factors affecting the flow of funds; investment analysis and procedures involved in real estate financing.
Prerequisite(s): FI 302 or CE 366 or IE 203.

FI 442. Business Risk Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of risks facing business and governmental entities. Various methods of both controlling the risks and financing the risks, including both insurance and non-insurance alternatives.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 341 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 443. Property Liability Insur. 3 sem. hrs.

Current financial, legal, and social problems concerning the property-liability insurance industry. Role of government in providing insurance and topics in the management of property-liability insurance companies and agencies.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 341 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 444. Life & Health Insurance. 3 sem. hrs.

Detailed analysis of life insurance and health insurance with emphasis on their role in employee-benefit planning. Specific provisions of qualified retirement plans. Current problems facing the life insurance industry and analysis of the distribution system for life and health insurance. Topics in management of life and health insurance companies and agencies.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and FI 341 and FI 302 or IE 203 or CE 366.

FI 460. Advanced Financial Planning. 3 sem. hrs.

The purpose of this course is to require the student to demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply his or her knowledge of financial planning topics as received through the curricula taught in the Wealth Management Concentration. Through this course, you will apply the financial planning process to real-life situations and to communicate your planning recommendations via both a written plan and an oral presentation.
Prerequisite(s): AC 371, FI 341, FI 360 and LGS 403
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FI 414 and FI 444.

FI 491. Independent Study. 1-6 sem. hr.

Students may earn degree credit for only one independent study course (491). Individually directed research and reading.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

FI 492. Internship. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations. The internship is administered through the C&BA Office of Student Services.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

FI 497. Spec Topics In Finance. 1-3 sem. hr.

Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

General Business Administration (GBA) Courses

GBA 145. Freshman Compass: CBA. 1 sem. hr.

An introduction to the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration. Topics include adjustment to college life, study skills, career exploration, and majors offered in the College.

GBA 171. STEM Business Honors I. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course introduces STEM students to critical and innovative thinking as it pertains to the issues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to basic economics and the global marketplace. The course begins to introduce business model design as a tool to better understand how businesses operate. In addition, the course will provide students with the opportunity to develop an appreciation and basic understanding of the importance of business skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opporunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA.

GBA 172. STEM Business Honors II. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course continues to build STEM students' critical and innovative thinking skills as they pertain to the iussues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to business ethics, business ownership structures, and entrepreneurship. The course continues to develop business model design as a tool to better understand how to operate. In addition, the course will provide students with the opportunity to work in teams with a goal of developing an appreciation and basic understanding of the importance of business skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opportunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA, GBA 171.

GBA 271. STEM Business Honors III. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course continues to build students' critical and innovative thinking skills as they pertain to the issues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to management roles, teamwork, and productive systems. The course continues to develop business model design as a tool to better understand how businesses operate. In addition, the course will provide students with the opportunity to work in teams, with a goal of developing skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opportunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA, GBA 171, GBA 172.

GBA 272. STEM Business Honors IV. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course continues to build STEM students' critical and innovative thinking skills as they pertain to the issues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to employee motivation, human resources management, and labor relations. The course continues to develop business model design as a tool to better understand how businesses operate, while introducing human centered design for designing business processes and products. In addition, the course will provide appreciation and basic understanding of the importance of business skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opportunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA, GBA 171, GBA 172, GBA 271.

GBA 300. Business Communications. 3 sem. hrs.

Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111 and LGS 200 and AC 210 or AC 201 and AC 202; and MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125; and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251.

GBA 310. Introduction Corporate America. 3 sem. hrs.

GBA 334. Introduction to Fraud Risk Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course provides a basic overview of fraud risk management in business, including the global fraud problem, fraud risk identification, assessment, prevention, dectection, and follow-up.
Prerequisite(s): AC 210.

GBA 371. STEM Business Honors V. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course continues to build STEM students' critical and innovative thinking skills as they pertain to the issues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to marketing, product and pricing issues, distribution and logistics, and customer communication. The course continues to develop business model design as a tool to better understand how businesses operate, and build an understanding of human centered design for designing business processes and products. In addition, the course will provide students with the opportunity to work in teams with a goal of developing an appreciation and basic understanding of the importance of business skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opportunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA, GBA 171, GBA 172, GBA 271, GBA 272.

GBA 372. STEM Business Honors VI. 1.5 sem. hr.

This course continues to build students' critical and innovative thinking skills as they pertain to the issues of today's business environment, while providing a modest introduction to financial information and accounting concepts, financial management, financial markets & investment strategies and the money supply and banking systems. The course continues to develop business model design as a tool to better understand how businesses operate, and build an understanding of human centered design for students with the opportunity to work in teams with a goal of developing an appreciation and basic understanding of the importance of business skills in their STEM careers. It will also create opportunities to network with other students as well as other business faculty.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the STEM Path to the MBA, GBA 171, GBA 172, GBA 271, GBA 272, GBA 371.

GBA 481. Business Honors Seminar I. 0.5-1.5 sem. hrs.

This course is interdisciplinary and emphasizes discussion and debate of contemporary business and economic issues and topics.

GBA 482. Business Honors Seminar II. 0.5-1.5 sem. hrs.

This course is interdisciplinary and emphasizes discussion and debate of contemporary business and economic issues and topics.

GBA 483. Business Honors Seminar III. 0.5-1.5 sem. hrs.

This courses is interdisciplinary and emphasizes discussion and debate of contemporary business and economic issues and topics.

GBA 484. Business Honors Seminar IV. 0.5-1.5 sem. hrs.

This course is interdisciplinary and emphasizes discussion and debate of contemporary business and economic issues and topics.

GBA 490. Strategic Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Examination of the managerial tasks of crafting and implementing strategic plans and the tools of strategic analysis. Students gain hands-on experience with tools and concepts of strategic management by participating in a business strategy simulation exercise and by analyzing actual companies.
Prerequisite(s): AC 210 and EC 110 and EC 111 and LGS 200 and ST 260 AND MATH 121 OR MATH 125
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MGT 300 and MKT 300 and OM 300 and FI 302 and GBA 300.

GBA 491. Independent Study. 3 sem. hrs.

Independent study in library or primary research. Not open to graduate students.

Health Care Management (HCM) Courses

HCM 370. Intro Health Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Detailed study of components of the health care delivery system in the United States. The course emphasizes history, roles, and interactions of the various providers, consumers, and governments.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125; and AC 210 and LGS 200 and ST 260 and CS 102
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MGT 300.

HCM 371. Management Health Care Organzt. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of operations within health care institutions.
Prerequisite(s): HCM 370.

HCM 473. Survey Issues Health Care Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

Examination of current issues in health care, including health care policies and their effect on the health care industry.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: HCM 370 and HCM 371.

HCM 476. Prin Of Long-Term Care. 3 sem. hrs.

The focus of this class will be on organizational platforms for delivering long-term health care, licensing and regulatory issues facing long-term care and operational and strategic issues facing long-term care.
Prerequisite(s): HCM 371.

HCM 477. Prin Ambulatory Care Managemen. 3 sem. hrs.

The purpose of this course is to help students understand the management issues in today's ambulatory care sector.
Prerequisite(s): HCM 371.

HCM 478. Health Care Information Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Study of healthcare clinical and administrative systems in the acute, ambulatory, long-term care, and home-health environments. Electronic health records, confidentiality, privacy and admissibility issues are addressed.
Prerequisite(s): HCM 370 AND MGT 300 AND (MIS 200 OR MIS 300 OR MIS 295).

HCM 491. Independent Study. 3 sem. hrs.

Students may earn degree credit for only one independent study course (491).
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146; and CS 102 and AC 210 or AC 201 and AC 202; and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and LGS 200.

HCM 492. Internship. 3 sem. hrs.

Supervised administrative work experience in the health care industry.

International Business Administration (IBA) Courses

IBA 250. Context of Glob Bus. 3 sem. hrs.

Broad introduction to international business providing students with an overview of the terms and concepts key to a better understanding of the complex business environment across the world's interrelated economies.
Prerequisite(s): EC 110 and EC 111.

IBA 350. Intro World Business. 3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the conduct of business across national boundaries and the impact of different cultures on business practices.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 or MKT 300.

IBA 351. Multinatl Business Communctn. 3 sem. hrs.

A study of the principles and practices of intercultural business communication, written and personal. The course requires substantial reading. The focus is on making students aware of the sources of common intercultural business communication problems, and on helping them develop strategies to avoid or correct these problems.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 or MKT 300.

IBA 455. Global Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

A course in marketing theory and methods as they apply to world markets. Among the topics discussed are: the importance of linking international marketing with the overall strategy of the business while examining the impact of cultural, political and legal issues and the economic differences in global strategies. Emphasis is placed on developing the marketing mix appropriate to various international global environments.

IBA 460. Export/Import Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course includes a thorough examination of the export-import management process and highlights its importance in international business strategy.
Prerequisite(s): IBA 350.

IBA 497. Special Topics: Ind. Study. 3 sem. hrs.

Legal Studies (LGS) Courses

LGS 200. Legal Environmt Business. 3 sem. hrs.

Environmental approach to the study of law, including the way the law interrelates, philosophy of law, and sources of law. The relationship among law, business, political influences, and the society is treated.

LGS 350. Crimes Torts Bus Envirn. 3 sem. hrs.

LGS 402. Government & Business. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to give students some information about the regulations which government may or may not impose upon business, leaving students free to form their own conclusions as to their wisdom, adequacy, and practicability. Survey of basic constitutional principles and legal aspects of recent federal legislation affecting business and antitrust laws.
Prerequisite(s): LGS 200 and EC 111.

LGS 403. Estates & Trusts. 3 sem. hrs.

This course treats principles and rules of law relating to wills and inheritances; how the estates of deceased persons are administered; why and how trusts are created and operated; and the duties and settlement of executors, administrators, and trustees.
Prerequisite(s): LGS 200.

LGS 407. Real & Personal Propty. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is concerned with the conveyance of property, deeds, covenants, condemnation of property, rights of landlord and tenant, and bailments.
Prerequisite(s): LGS 200.

LGS 472. Legal Aspect Hlth Care. 3 sem. hrs.

Examines aspects of the law that are of most concern to individuals in health care management, including administrative law, hospital law, welfare law, public health law, and licensing and legislation.
Prerequisite(s): LGS 200 and HCM 370.

LGS 497. Special Topics. 1-3 sem. hr.

Prerequisite(s): LGS 200.

Management (MGT) Courses

MGT 300. Org Theory & Behavior. 3 sem. hrs.

A course designed to help students understand organizational theory, interpersonal communication, and other behavioral science concepts and then integrate them into managerial tools for effective use in business, industry, and public-sector organizations.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126; and ST 260 and LGS 200 and EC 110 and AC 210.

MGT 301. Intro Human Resource Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

Introductory course surveying problems and issues in labor economics, personnel management, and labor relations. Emphasis is placed on public policies affecting management and union representatives and on the role of the human resources manager in the organization.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 and EC 110 and EC 111.

MGT 320. Leadership. 3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the interpersonal dynamics of managers, professionals, and entrepreneurs at work. Case analysis and simulation of problem solving and decision making are used to develop insight into human relations in organizations as well as to develop the personal and interpersonal skills needed in leadership roles.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 322. Effective Negotiations. 3 sem. hrs.

Negotiations are pervasive in all aspects of life. Having the ability to effectively negotiate can provide you with a competitive advantage in many situations. This course will employ negotiations exercises, expert guest speakers and additional readings to help students master negotiation skills.
Prerequisite(s): Junior class standing and enrollment in College of Commerce and Business Administration, OR by permission of instructor.

MGT 341. Business Ethics. 3 sem. hrs.

Systematic examination of current issues and problems in the organization and management of business enterprises. The course combines readings, cases, and lectures that focus on the roles, activities, and ethical choices of managers as they direct organizations within the context of our contemporary society.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 minimum grade of C-.

MGT 386. Foundations of Entrepreneurshi. 3 sem. hrs.

Emphasis is on how to manage a small company and operate it profitably. Special attention is given to the problems of different types of small enterprises, such as those in retail, service, franchise, and manufacturing industries.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 406. Family Business Management. 3 sem. hrs.

MGT 406 will offer: 1) several perspectives on family business and 2) address the challenges and opportunities unique to the management of family businesses.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MGT 386.

MGT 412. Mgt Presentations. 3 sem. hrs.

Instruction and practice of information presentation in a business environment. Topics include conference room presentations, media briefings, team presentations, television interviews and audiovisual development.
Prerequisite(s): GBA 300 and MGT 300.

MGT 415. Ethics is Leadership Decision-Making: A Descriptive Functional Behavioral Analytic. 3 sem. hrs.

Using applied descriptive functional behavioral analytic techniques, students sequentially analyze, decompose, and develop models to explain unethical leadership decision making in organizations using quasi-naturalistic behavioral observation.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 or MGT 320 or MGT 341.

MGT 420. Organizational Change. 3 sem. hrs.

An investigation of structural, technological, humanistic, and task approaches to organizational change; the resistance to change; and the implementation of change in business and in private- and public-sector organizations.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 and MGT 301.

MGT 421. Corporate Entp. & Innovation. 3 sem. hrs.

This course uses a case analysis method to examine the development and implementation of managerial actions in modern organizations.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 422. Leadership Communication. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the role of communication in effective leadership for all management situtations.

MGT 431. Human Resources Selection and Placement. 3 sem. hrs.

The main purpose of this course is to provide students with detailed knowledge of an organization's staffing function. The knowledge includes, but is not limited to, understanding how to conduct a job's analysis, how to write a job description and the specifications of that job, how to choose appropriate recruitment and selection methods, how to structure and execute valid job interviews, how to write job offer letters, and how to evaluate the overall effectiveness of an organization's staffing strategy and policies.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 301.

MGT 432. Employee Relations. 3 sem. hrs.

A critical examination of the factors that condition employee relations in both the private and public sectors.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300 and MGT 301.

MGT 433. Compensation and Performance Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course will enable students to identify the components of a total reward system, understand the major compensation system design issues, become familiar with the provisions of the FLSA, and understand the relationship between compensation and performance management.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 301.

MGT 434. Training and Development. 3 sem. hrs.

This course examines both the theory and practice of training and development in organizations. Topics covered will include organizational, task, and individual needs assessment, training design and implementation, and evaluation techniques. This course will draw upon research and theory from management, psychology, and other relevant domains. Application of the text/lecture materials will be reinforced through class exercises, group assignments, guest lectures, and presentations.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300, MGT 301.

MGT 437. Strategic Human Resource Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to provide a broad, strategic overview of human resource management with practical applications. It will define and describe strategic HRM and identify the specific HR issues within organizational strategies, goals, and tasks. This class is designed to prepare students to sit for the SHRM college level certification exam.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 301 and three of the four HR concentration classes (MGT 431, MGT 432, MGT 433, MGT 434).

MGT 452. Management Communication Projects. 3 sem. hrs.

Demonstrate communication effectiveness in a business context by completing team project for a client, using written, oral, visual,and interpersonal skills.
Prerequisite(s): GBA 300 and MGT 300.

MGT 482. New Venture Development. 3 sem. hrs.

This course provides an opportunity to develop a business plan for a new venture or for expansion of an existing company. Students are expected to acquire skills in evaluating business ventures; to learn alternative financing sources; to develop ideas for differentiating products; and to develop an understanding of what is required to harvest the profits of a growing business.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 483. Technology Commercialization. 3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on getting ideas, innovations, or discoveries into the marketplace in the form of products or services, or into the value chain at any step, to increase the competitive advantage of the enterprise. The course offers an overview of the technology commercialization process. But more importantly, the course provides opportunities to assess technologies for commercialization. Indeed, the most useful description of the course is as a practicum in technology assessment. Throughout the course, students are engaged in technology assessment projects. This course links the activities of research and development, product and process design, technology transfer and marketing, new venture financing, technology entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship, protection of intellectual property, and management.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 386, or permission of the instructor.

MGT 486. Small Business Consultng. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to offer education and training in the art of management consulting as it applies to smaller firms. The overall purpose of the course is the acquisition of knowledge and skills that will enable students to provide management advice to entrepreneurs and businesspersons to improve the performance of smaller organizations.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 491. Independent Study. 1-3 sem. hr.

The course offers students interested in management the opportunity to study in a particular area of the field, under the guidance of an individual faculty member. Open to juniors and seniors with the advice and permission of the appropriate instructor and the approval of the program chairperson.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 492. Internship In Hrm. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations. The internship is administered through the C&BA Office of Student Services.
Prerequisite(s): MGT 300.

MGT 497. Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs.

Management Information Systems (MIS) Courses

MIS 120. Business Programming I. 3 sem. hrs.

First computing class designed for students that will be majoring in Management Information Systems.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 145 or MATH 126 or MATH 146.

MIS 200. Fundamentals Mgt Info Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Business process coordination and decision making through the use of information technology will be explored, emphasizing IT use by organizations in increasingly global markets.
Prerequisite(s): CS 102 or PLCS 380.

MIS 295. Business Analysis Project Mgt. 0 or 3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of business-process analysis, team-based project management, and use of information technology resources to develop information systems. Emphasis is placed on creating business value in systems ranging from transactional processing to e-commerce.
Prerequisite(s): CS 120 with concurrency OR CS 150 with concurrency
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CS 150 or CS 120.

MIS 310. Applied Organizational Information Technologies. 3 sem. hrs.

Students learn the IS development process and how to leverage underlying organizational IT components. Provides non-technology major students with the essentials of how IS are developed and used. Emphasis is on databases, data networks, mobile computing, and decision support.
Prerequisite(s): CS 102 or CS 120.

MIS 320. Applicatn & Informtn Architect. 3 sem. hrs.

The study and application of software engineering, application patterns, and file structures. Students design, construct, and test software structures for effective information management.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 295 and CS 220.

MIS 330. Database Administration. 3 sem. hrs.

Logical data modeling, RDBMS, and their use in the business enterprise are presented. Topics include anomalies/normalization, database-connections performance, n-tier architecture, query operations, stored processes and integrity triggers, and Web applications.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 295; and CS 120 or CS 150.

MIS 340. Data Com in a Global Environ.. 3 sem. hrs.

Enabling international exchange of digital data to support business operations. Cultural, legal, security and operational requirements coupled with international standards evaluated in multiple network architectural configurations supporting transactional knowledge workers, e-business and e-commerce applications.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 200 or MIS 295; and CS 120 or CS 150.

MIS 430. Systems Analysis & Design I. 3 sem. hrs.

Intermediate-level skills in systems analysis and design techniques are presented. Emphasis is placed on systems development and delivery tools, methods, standards, and processes.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 320 and MIS 330
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MIS 450.

MIS 431. Systems Analysis & Design II. 3 sem. hrs.

Advanced-level skills in systems analysis and design techniques are presented. Emphasis is placed on enterprise-level systems development, creation of tailored methodologies, creation of architectural standards, metrics, and business strategy alignment.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 340 and MIS 430 and MIS 450
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MIS 451.

MIS 440. Decision Support Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

This course assesses information and process requirements to support business decisions in organizations. Students conceptualize, design, develop, and deliver model-based information systems designed to support effective managerial decision making.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 200 or MIS 295.

MIS 450. Systems Constructn Implemtn I. 3 sem. hrs.

Leveraging software development skills from prior MIS and CS courses, students construct, test, and deploy IT-based business solutions.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 320 and MIS 330
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MIS 430.

MIS 451. Systems Constructn Implemtn II. 3 sem. hrs.

Development of advanced software engineering skills to develop, deploy, test, document, and assess large-scale IT-based business solutions. Conversion, migration, training, maintenance, and operations plans and budget are emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): MIS 340 and MIS 430 and MIS 450
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MIS 431.

MIS 491. Independent Study. 1-3 sem. hr.

MIS 492. Internship. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public-sector organizations. The internship is administered through the C&BA Office of Student Services. Students may earn degree credit for only one internship (492).

MIS 497. Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs.

Special topics in MIS.

Marketing (MKT) Courses

MKT 300. Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

A survey course that describes the nature of domestic and global marketing management. Emphasis is placed on market analysis to include consumer, industrial, institutional, and governmental markets for goods and services. Also emphasized are the marketing management functions of planning, pricing, promoting, and distributing goods and services in business and nonprofit contexts.

MKT 310. Principles of Social Media. 3 sem. hrs.

A survey of interactive, electronic media and technology that enable organizations to 1) acquire products, services and materials from suppliers, 2) market goods and services to customers, 3) allow members of the organization to communicate with each other, and 4) monitor the external environment. Students develop e-commerce-related skills to design and execute a firm's marketing efforts, including Web project management, electronic market development and management, Web-enabled selling, and other emerging areas of marketing.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 313. Consumer Behavior. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the basic processes underlying buyer behavior. Various factors are examined, including external influences (e.g., culture, reference groups, family) and internal influences (e.g., perceptions, attitudes, personality). Primary emphasis is on final consumers with a secondary emphasis on the external and internal influences affecting organizational buyers.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 321. Retail Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of existing generalizations and principles related to the economic and social role of retailing; competitive strategies; efficiency in retailing; and essential concepts for retail management.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 334. Impr. Mgt. Beh. Lab.. 1 sem. hr.

The class teaches students how to effectively apply the persuasion and impression management theory so that they can effectively influence individuals and others.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MKT 300.

MKT 337. Personal Selling. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to successful selling practices and principles through presentation, discussion, role playing, and workshops. Includes principles of prospecting, establishing rapport, generating curiosity, being persuasive, creating desire, handling objections, and closing.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 338. Sales Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course builds on the basic sales process taught in Personal Selling (MKT337) by focusing on Account Management and Team Management. Through class discussion and an Account Plan project, students gain an understanding of customer partnerships, business management, and sales team development. The concept that sales managers must both implement and facilitate corporate marketing plans is pervasive through the course.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 and MKT 337.

MKT 371. Site Select Mkt Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 376. Services Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

To understand the basic concepts and principles surrounding services marketing and management including processes, people, and physical evidence.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 385. Marketing Information Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduces students to the types of information systems used in marketing as well as develop the basic analytical skills necessary to use the output from such systems. The course has a decision-making focus and will survey the tools available for marketing decision making. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 and MATH 121; or MATH 115 and MATH 125; or MATH 121; or MATH 125; or MATH 126; or MATH 131; and EC 110 and EC 111 and CS 102 and AC 210 and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251; and LGS 200.

MKT 410. Managing Innovation. 3 sem. hrs.

Systematic examination of product policy and of the major concepts, methods, and strategies involved in decision making in the course of developing new products. Techniques and criteria used to identify and implement new products and services are examined in depth. Consideration is given to issues and strategies involved in the management of mature products.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 411. Supply Chain Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Supply chain management encompasses the design and administration of the systems of suppliers and distributors that collectively provide for the exchange of title, physical movement, and storage activities in marketing. The scale and complexity of supply chain relationships are escalating as firms strive to enhance interorganizational effectiveness and efficiency. This course examines the role of manufacturers and intermediaries in channel strategies and the scope, methods, problems, and opportunities of systemic supply chain coordination.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 422. Supply Chain Strategy. 3 sem. hrs.

Logistics is a system-based concept requiring the effective coordination of the flow of materials and goods from the point of origin to the end user. This course explores the key marketing tasks necessary to achieve an efficient logistics network: transportation, warehousing and materials handling, inventory management, forecasting, information and order processing, and simulation/modeling.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300 and MKT 411.

MKT 437. Advanced Selling. 3 sem. hrs.

The purpose of the course is to enhance communication and selling skills. Focus will be on the account managment principles and the processes used to develop account and long term relationships with major accounts. Live selling situations will be used to practice skills.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 337.

MKT 439. Key Account Management. 3 sem. hrs.

To understand and practice the science of managing customer lifecycles; including account sourcing, analysis, categorization, strategic planning, tactical development and implementation.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 337 Personal Selling.

MKT 444. Promotional Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Intensive investigation of underlying ideas, principles, and concepts that may be used to inform consumers of the availability and attributes of products and services. The course includes a comprehensive overview of promotional and sales management activities and tactics.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 460. Export/Import Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Course includes a thorough examination of export-import management processes and highlights the importance of management in international business strategy.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 473. Marketing Research. 3 sem. hrs.

Designed to prepare the student to be an informed, effective user of marketing research. Provides an overview of research techniques available for collecting information to answer specific research questions. Therefore, the orientation of the course is managerial.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 476. Services Management. 3 sem. hrs.

To understand and practice the science of managing services in terms of service processes, physical and technology elements, and people.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MKT 376.

MKT 477. Advanced Services Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

To understand and practice the science of managing services in terms of service processes, physical and technology elements, and people.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 376, MKT 476.

MKT 487. Strategic Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of marketing problems as they relate to the managerial functions of planning, organizing, and controlling marketing.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 313
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MKT 473.

MKT 488. Marketing Field Study. 3 sem. hrs.

Working with a client firm, students apply (in a practical setting) the skills and knowledge they have acquired and build new skills in project management.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 491. Independent Study. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students may earn degree credit for only one independent study course (491).
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

MKT 492. Internship. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations. The internship is administered through the C&BA Office of Student Services.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146; and CS 102 and LGS 200 and AC 210 or AC 201 and AC 202; and ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251.

MKT 493. Special Topics Marketing. 3 sem. hrs.

Courses that offer the faculty a chance to present topics of interest to themselves and to marketing students.
Prerequisite(s): MKT 300.

Operations Management (OM) Courses

OM 300. Intro Operations Management. 3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the field of operations management and addresses the design and management of the activities and resources that a firm uses to produce and deliver its products or services. Topics include operations strategy, product and process design, total quality management, statistical quality control, supply chain management, location analysis, forecasting, inventory management, operations planning, and lean/JIT business processes.
Prerequisite(s): ST 260.

OM 310. Introduction Management Scienc. 3 sem. hrs.

Concepts of management science and their application to decision making. Topics include linear programming, transportation models, integer programming, dynamic programming, queuing theory, decision theory, and network models.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 321. Prod Planning & Contrl. 3 sem. hrs.

The planning and control of production and service systems. Attention is given to forecasting, operations planning, scheduling, materials management, and operations control.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 360. Comparative Production Systems. 3 sem. hrs.

OM 375. Statistical Quality Control. 3 sem. hrs.

Statistical methods useful in control of quality of manufactured products. Topics include Shewhart and cumulative sum control charts; process capability analysis; and acceptance sampling procedures by attributes and variables. Emphasis is on understanding, design, implementation, and interpretation of these techniques.

OM 385. Information Tech Oper Mgt. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the components of management information systems and applications of computer-based systems to business decisions. Open only to OM majors or by permission of the instructor. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): ST 260 or ST 250 and ST 251.

OM 417. Logistics Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Logistics deals with the planning and control of material flows and related information in organizations. This course covers logistics systems planning, organization, and control of these activities with a special emphasis on quantitative aspects of the decisions.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 420. Computer Simulation. 3 sem. hrs.

The use of simulation as a tool to understand and improve the performance of complex systems and processes. Students will learn the details of a specific simulation language. Applications to production processes and operational activities. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): OM 310.

OM 422. Operations Scheduling. 3 sem. hrs.

A broad investigation into a variety of scheduling activities in a variety of environments. Topics include scheduling as applied to projects, job-shops, assembly lines, parallel machine systems, workforce, and transportation.
Prerequisite(s): OM 321.

OM 423. Inventory Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Control techniques for the large multi-item inventories frequently associated with manufacturing supply and wholesale-retail operations. The limitations and usefulness of models in actual practice.
Prerequisite(s): OM 321.

OM 425. Effective Quality Management. 3 sem. hrs.

Provides a broad understanding of the philosophies and methods used to enhance organizational effectiveness in a wide range of organizational settings.

OM 427. Purchasing and Sourcing. 3 sem. hrs.

Course covers fundamental purchasing systems applications, supplier relations and evaluation, strategic planning in purchasing, purchasing techniques, value analysis and cost analysis.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 450. Process Mgmt & Improvement. 3 sem. hrs.

An analytical study of strategies, tactics, and techniques for designing, evaluating and analyzing, controlling and improving processes. Emphasis is on topics such as Design for Flexibility, Lean, Six Sigma, Constraint Management will all be included along with process application of OM analytical tools such as simulation, queuing analysis, and value stream mapping.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 487. Capstone Project Seminar. 3 sem. hrs.

Course addresses the design, operation, and continuous improvement of business operations that deliver products and services. Students will work in teams on an operations oriented project with a local company. The student teams will provide periodic reports and presentations on their project work.
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 491. Independent Study. 3 sem. hrs.

Students may earn degree credit for only one independent study course (491).
Prerequisite(s): OM 300.

OM 492. Internship In Operations Mgt. 1-3 sem. hr.

Students are selected through a competitive process for assignments in approved business or public sector organizations.

OM 497. Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs.

Statistics (ST) Courses

ST 260. Statistical Data Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the use of basic statistical concepts in business applications. Topics include extensive graphing; descriptive statistics; measures of central tendency and variation; regression, including transformations for curvature; sampling techniques; designs; conditional probability; random variables; probability distributions; sampling distributions; confidence intervals; and statistical inference. Computer software applications are utilized extensively. Emphasis throughout the course in on interpretation. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146; and CS 102 or CS 150 or CS 120 or GES 131 or GES 145 or PLCS 380.

ST 450. Stat Methods In Res I. 3 sem. hrs.

Development of fundamental concepts of organizing, exploring, and summarizing data; probability; common probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing for means, proportions, and variances using parametric and nonparametric procedures; power analysis; goodness of fit; contingency tables. Statistical software packages are used extensively to facilitate valid analysis and interpretation of results. Emphasis is on methods and on selecting proper statistical techniques for analyzing real situations.

ST 451. Stat Methods In Res II. 3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of variance and design of experiments, including randomization, replication, and blocking; multiple comparisons; correlation; simple and multiple regression techniques, including variable selection, detection of outliers, and model diagnostics. Statistical software packages are used extensively to facilitate valid analysis and interpretation of results. Emphasis is on appropriate analysis of data in real situations.
Prerequisite(s): ST 450 or GES 255.

ST 452. Applied Regression Analysis. 3 sem. hrs.

Data analysis using multiple linear regression, including residual plots, transformations, hypothesis tests, outlier diagnostics, analysis of covariance, variable selection techniques and co-linearity. Logistic regression uses similarly discussed for dealing with binary valued independent variables.
Prerequisite(s): ST 260.

ST 454. Mathematical Statistics I. 3 sem. hrs.

Distributions of random variables, moments of random variables, probability distributions, joint distributions, and change of variable techniques.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 227.

ST 455. Mathematical Statistics II. 3 sem. hrs.

Theory of order statistics, point estimation, interval estimation, and hypothesis testing.
Prerequisite(s): ST 454.

ST 497. Special Topics. 3 sem. hrs.